Adiponectin regulates cutaneous wound healing by promoting keratinocyte proliferation and migration via the ERK signaling pathway

Sayaka Shibata, Yayoi Tada, Yoshihide Asano, Carren S. Hau, Toyoaki Kato, Hidehisa Saeki, Toshimasa Yamauchi, Naoto Kubota, Takashi Kadowaki, Shinichi Sato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetic patients are at high risk of developing delayed cutaneous wound healing. Adiponectin plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and is considered to be involved in various pathological conditions associated with diabetes; however, its role in wound repair is unknown. In this study, we elucidated the involvement of adiponectin in cutaneous wound healing in vitro and in vivo. Normal human keratinocytes expressed adiponectin receptors, and adiponectin enhanced proliferation and migration of keratinocytes in vitro. This proliferative and migratory effect of adiponectin was mediated via AdipoR1/AdipoR2 and the ERK signaling pathway. Consistent with in vitro results, wound closure was significantly delayed in adiponectin-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, and more importantly, keratinocyte proliferation and migration during wound repair were also impaired in adiponectindeficient mice. Furthermore, both systemic and topical administration of adiponectin ameliorated impaired wound healing in adiponectin-deficient and diabetic db/db mice, respectively. Collectively, these results indicate that adiponectin is a potent mediator in the regulation of cutaneous wound healing. We propose that upregulation of systemic and/or local adiponectin levels is a potential and very promising therapeutic approach for dealing with diabetic wounds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3231-3241
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume189
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Sept 15

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