Effect of particle arrangement and density on aerodynamic interference between twin particles interacting with a plane shock wave

Shun Takahashi, Takayuki Nagata, Yusuke Mizuno, Taku Nonomura, Shigeru Obayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Unsteady drag, unsteady lift, and movement of one or two moving particles caused by the passage of a planar shock wave are investigated using particle-resolved simulations of viscous flows. The particle motion analysis is carried out based on particle-resolved simulations for one or two particles under a shock Mach number of 1.22 and a particle Reynolds number of 49, and the particle migration and fluid forces are investigated. The unsteady drag, unsteady lift, and particle behavior are investigated for different densities and particle configurations. The time evolution of the unsteady drag and lift is changed by interference by the planar shock wave, Mach stem convergence, and the shock wave reflected from the other particle. These two particles become closer after the shock wave passes than in the initial state under most conditions. Two particles placed in an in-line arrangement approach each other very closely due to the passage of a shock wave. On the other hand, two particles placed in a side-by-side arrangement are only slightly closer to each other after the shock wave passes between them. The pressure waves resulting from Mach stem convergence of the upstream particle and the reflected shock waves from the downstream particle are the main factors responsible for the force in the direction that pushes the particles apart. The wide distance between the two particles attenuates these pressure waves, and the particles reduce their motion away from each other.

Original languageEnglish
Article number113301
JournalPhysics of Fluids
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Nov

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