Interaction of a Bubble Attached to a Gelatine Wall with a Shock Wave (A Study of Tissue Damage Caused by Bubble Collapse)

Tetsuya Kodama, Yukio Tomita, Akira Shima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble attached to a gelatine wall was experimentally and numerically investigated to elucidate the mechanism of tissue damage caused by bubble collapse. The gelatine concentration was varied between 10 and 30% by weight. It is shown by means of highspeed photography that a shock wave of strength 0.45 MPa causes 0.3∼1.8 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity liquid microjets with penetration depths of approximately 0.5 ∼1.0 times the initial bubble diameter. Our results show that bubbles collapse violently in response to sudden changes in the ambient pressure generating high pressure and high temperature. Tissue damage due to bubble collapse is caused by the combination of impact and impulsive pressure and thermal effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1431-1435
Number of pages5
JournalNihon Kikai Gakkai Ronbunshu, B Hen/Transactions of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers, Part B
Volume59
Issue number561
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Keywords

  • Bubble
  • Cavitation
  • Gelatine
  • Impulsive Pressure
  • Liquid Microjet
  • Shoke Wave
  • Thermal Effect
  • Tissue Damage

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Interaction of a Bubble Attached to a Gelatine Wall with a Shock Wave (A Study of Tissue Damage Caused by Bubble Collapse)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this