Which Is the Best Substrate to Regenerate? A Comparative Pot Experiment for Tree Seedling Growth on Decayed Wood and in Soil

Yu Fukasawa, Hiroyuki Kitabatake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Dead wood is an important microsite for seedling regeneration in forest ecosystems. Although recent studies have found important associations between fungal wood decay type (white rot and brown rot) and both density and species composition of regenerating seedlings, its abiotic and biotic mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, pot experiments were conducted with the seedlings of two ectomycorrhizal tree species (Abies veitchii and Betula ermanii) and two arbuscular mycorrhizal tree species (Chamaecyparis obtusa and Cryptomeria japonica) to evaluate their growth using three substrates: brown rot wood, white rot wood, and soil. Results showed that the shoot growth of B. ermanii grown in white rot wood was greater than in other substrates, but this effect disappeared in sterilized substrates, suggesting some biotic positive effects occur in white rot wood. The seedling weights of Cr. japonica and Ch. obtusa were found to be greater in soil than in wood, and this may be partly attributable to the high mycorrhizal rate of their roots in soil. Colonization of arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal fungi was restricted to the seedlings in unsterilized soil. These results demonstrate the importance of the biological mechanisms affecting seedlings’ preferences for a variety of regeneration microsites and illustrate the need for future experiments to include larger sets of seedling species.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1036
JournalForests
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Jul

Keywords

  • Betula ermanii
  • arbuscular mycorrhiza
  • brown rot
  • ectomycorrhiza
  • nurse log
  • white rot

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry

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